Robotic Arms And Temporary Motorisation—The Next Generation Of Wheelchairs

Next-generation wheelchairs could incorporate brain-controlled robotic arms and rentable add-on motors in order to help people with disabilities more easily carry out daily tasks or get around a city.

Professor Nicolás García-Aracil from the Universidad Miguel Hernández (UMH) in Elche, Spain, has developed an automated wheelchairwith an exoskeleton robotic arm to use at home, as part of a project called AIDE.

It uses artificial intelligence to extract relevant information from the user, such as their behaviour, intentions and emotional state, and also analyses its environmental surroundings, he says.

The system, which is based on an arm exoskeleton attached to a robotised wheelchair, is designed to help people living with various degrees and forms of disabilities carry out daily functions such as eating, drinking, and washing up, on their own and at home. While the user sits in the wheelchair, they wear the robotised arm to help them grasp objects and bring them close—or as the whole system is connected to the home automation system they can ask the wheelchair to move in a specific direction or go into a particular room. READ MORE ON: PHYS.ORG

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RoboticsYusra Hamid